Blog


The Most Common Kitchen Layouts


December 16th, 2015 | Kitchens

If you’re currently planning to redesign your kitchen, one of the first decisions you’ll have to make is about the layout. The configuration you choose will impact everything from the appliances you order, to the cabinetry you need, to the lighting plan for the space (not to mention how well your new kitchen both looks and functions once the renovation is over). Needless to say, it’s a decision that deserves some serious thought. If you’re in the beginning stages of your design research, consider starting with one of these common kitchen layouts, and customizing it to suit the needs of your family and your space.

The galley kitchen. A galley kitchen is popular in small spaces. It’s designed with cabinets and appliances on two parallel walls in a space that’s typically narrow, giving it a hallway or corridor-like look. Though it’s a space-saver and ideal for one or two cooks, galley kitchens can feel cramped in family homes or for those who do a lot of entertaining and want to be part of the action while playing host.

2- south End kitchen after

An L-shaped kitchen layout with a peninsula.

The L-shaped kitchen. L-shaped kitchens place all utilities and cabinetry on two perpendicular walls, giving the kitchen and L-shape. L shaped kitchens work well in open concept spaces, as well as with the addition of a center island. The shape also naturally allows for a work triangle.

The U-shaped kitchen. Need all the storage space you can get? Try a U-shaped kitchen (sometimes called a C-shaped kitchen), which has appliances and cabinetry on three walls, creating a U-shape. U-shaped kitchens are great contenders for larger homes or family spaces, but note that if your kitchen is over a certain size, your designer will likely suggest adding in an island to maximize functionality (otherwise your major work zones may be too far apart).

A single wall modern kitchen layout

A single wall modern kitchen layout

Single wall kitchen. Another popular choice for saving space, single wall kitchens are built entirely along one wall. If you go this route, it’s especially important to plan a functional work layout so cooking doesn’t become cumbersome. Center islands also work well with single wall kitchens since they add an extra point for a work triangle, as well as additional storage space.

For help choosing the best layout for your kitchen design, contact Divine Design Build, or see more design inspiration on our Houzz profile.


, , , , , ,
 
Share this: